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Gardeners Rush To Order Their Seeds As Demand Skyrockets

Have you ordered your seeds for the upcoming growing season? If not, don’t wait any longer! Much like last spring, many seed companies are experiencing record sales and are warning that customers may not be able to get exactly what they want if they don’t order soon.

Early Bird Gets The Worm

It might sound crazy, but I ordered my seeds for the 2021 growing season last November! Full disclosure: I may have gone a little overboard too.

Like many others, I do not want to be desperately searching for seeds this spring only to find that what I love to grow and eat isn’t available.

Sky-High Demand

When COVID-19 hit in March of last year, seed packets flew off the shelves at garden centers and seed banks as people looked to become more self-sustainable. Demand in this industry has never been so high, and the piqued interest in growing isn’t going anywhere.

A recent story by CBC News says gardeners of all skill levels are looking to avoid last year’s drama by placing their orders early.

Some seed companies say the typical March rush happened in January this year. Others have temporarily closed online orders so they can keep up with the demand.

Sold-Out Varieties

A quick look at the seed banks I order from shows that some fruit and vegetable varieties have sold out for the season. This becomes especially problematic for gardeners who need climate-specific seeds.

And if you’re hoping to get seed potatoes, I noticed many companies have already run out of many tubers.

Don’t Worry, Be Happy

Not all hope is lost; rest assured that there are plenty of seeds available, and some companies told CBC they ramped up seed production last summer to accommodate for the increased demand this year. You may just need to shop around a bit.

And if you’re not ordering online, garden centers usually only put out their full stock of seeds in the spring.

seed orders

You may not be able to get your hands on exactly what you want this year, but view it as an opportunity to try new varieties that you may end up loving.

Gardening is a fantastic way to pass the time during a pandemic. We’re all spending a lot more time at home, and if you have kids, getting them involved instills lifelong interest and values. The therapeutic benefits associated with growing plants are proven.

So, if you haven’t already, think about what you want to grow this year and get your orders in! The time is now.

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Author

Catherine Sherriffs

Editor at Garden Culture Magazine

Catherine is a Canadian award-winning journalist who worked as a reporter and news anchor in Montreal’s radio and television scene for 10 years. A graduate of Concordia University, she left the hustle and bustle of the business after starting a family. Now, she’s the editor and a writer for Garden Culture Magazine while also enjoying being a mom to her two young kids. Her interests include great food, gardening, fitness, animals, and anything outdoors.