Polyface Farm

Swoope, Virginia, USA

In 1961, the property Polyface Farm currently sits on was worn-out and eroded. Then, William and Lucille Salatin came along, and by working with nature, they turned the abused land into a flourishing oasis.

Three generations of the Salatin family have tirelessly planted trees, built compost piles, dug ponds, and moved cows daily with portable electric fencing. Polyface produces “salad bar” beef, pork, pasteurized poultry and eggs, forage-based rabbits, and forestry products. But first and foremost, the family says it’s in the earthworm enhancement business. They treat the soil like gold; no chemical fertilizers are ever used on the property, and they don’t even own a plow or silo.

Polyface is beyond organic and takes pride in its emotionally, environmentally, and economically sound business. The direct marketing farm makes over one million dollars in sales, and yet never advertises. When you call them, a real-life human picks up the phone. Imagine that?

As the cattle are moved about the property to graze on fresh ‘salad,’ the chickens follow, scratching through dung and scattering nutrients int the soil. The pigs aerate the compost and finish on acorns in forest glens.

The best part? This symbiotic, multi-species production model yields more per acre than industrial farms. 

Polyface proves it’s all possible.

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Author

Catherine is a Canadian award-winning journalist who worked as a reporter and news anchor in Montreal’s radio and television scene for 10 years. A graduate of Concordia University, she left the hustle and bustle of the business after starting a family. Now, she’s the editor and a writer for Garden Culture Magazine while also enjoying being a mom to her two young kids. Her interests include great food, gardening, fitness, animals, and anything outdoors.

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